When you sign a lease, you are promising under contract that you will pay rent to the landlord. This is a legal obligation that courts take seriously. You may be liable to the landlord for loss of revenue that the landlord suffers as a result of you not paying the rent, even if you have a good reason for not being able to take possession. In some situations it may be less costly for you to simply take possession and immediately serve notice that you will be vacating as soon as the notice period expires - it may sometimes be better to pay for one or two months' rent than to go to court and be forced to pay more.
The landlord's obligations are defined by the terms and conditions contained in the lease and the laws specific to where the property is located. The most important obligations of the landlord include providing the tenant access to the property and allowing the tenant peaceful enjoyment of the property. The legal owner of the property also has obligations to maintain the property to minimum standards.
Section 14. The staff or the building manager may enter the Premises at any time in the event of an emergency. With two days prior notice, the Landlord or Landlord’s agents may enter the Premises at reasonable times and manners to make repairs or improvements, or to show the Premises to prospective buyers or tenants. The Landlord may also enter the Premises to conduct a semi-annual inspection to check for safety or maintenance problems.
Tenancy Agreements: A tenancy agreement is a contract between a landlord and tenant that outlines the terms of the tenancy – it’s an important legal document. These tenancy agreement templates accurately reflect the Residential Tenancy Act and the Manufactured Home Park Tenancy Act, as well as any accompanying regulations. The Residential Tenancy Branch (RTB) does not provide warranties on these templates.
Prior to moving in, the tenant and the landlord should walk through the premises and write down any existing damage. This written account is called an inspection report. The landlord and tenant should both get a copy of this report. In some jurisdictions, an inspection report is also required upon moving out, as a condition for the landlord to make a claim against the tenant's security deposit.
The landlord can deduct from the security deposit when the tenancy ends and the tenant owes the landlord money for either unpaid rent or damage to the premises. The landlord generally cannot deduct for reasonable "wear and tear" on the premises, (i.e. wear and tear that occurs just from living in the premises). The landlord can deduct for stains on the carpet or countertops, large holes in the wall, and missing appliances and other such things that are beyond reasonable wear and tear.
Because this is a complicated situation, you may wish to contact a qualified lawyer in your jurisdiction, especially if large sums of money are involved. You should inform your landlord immediately of the situation, so it cannot later be claimed that the landlord suffered losses as a result of not knowing that you were not going to move in. You may also wish to contact your local Residential Tenancies Board or government agency who oversees landlord/tenant disputes to find out the extent of your liability, which may or may not be limited by statute. 

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The Tenant acknowledges that the Landlord’s property insurance does not cover the Tenant’s personal property. The Landlord accepts no liability for damage or loss to the Tenant’s personal property for any reason. The Tenant acknlowledges their responsibility to obtain appropriate Renters’ Insurance to protect the value of their personal belongings.
A Residential Lease Agreement is a lease agreement that is specific to residential rental properties and is used to outline the terms and conditions of a tenancy, including the rights and obligations of the landlord and tenant. It can be used for various types of residential properties, including apartments, houses, condos, duplexes, townhouses, and more.
When you sign a lease, you are promising under contract that you will pay rent to the landlord. This is a legal obligation that courts take seriously. You may be liable to the landlord for loss of revenue that the landlord suffers as a result of you not paying the rent, even if you have a good reason for not being able to take possession. In some situations it may be less costly for you to simply take possession and immediately serve notice that you will be vacating as soon as the notice period expires - it may sometimes be better to pay for one or two months' rent than to go to court and be forced to pay more.
A lease with a predetermined end date, usually called a fixed term lease, is when the tenant agrees to rent the property for a certain period of time at a fixed price. This type of lease uses calendar dates to specify the start and end of the lease. At the end of a fixed term lease, the landlord and tenant can sign a new lease with updated dates and information or move on. 

Any waiver by the Landlord of any failure by the Tenant to perform or observe the provisions of this Lease will not operate as a waiver of the Landlord's rights under this Lease in respect of any subsequent defaults, breaches or non-performance and will not defeat or affect in any way the Landlord's rights in respect of any subsequent default or breach.
The time use of a chattel or other so called "personal property" is covered under general contract law, but the term lease also nowadays extends to long term rental contracts of more expensive non-Real properties such as automobiles, boats, planes, office equipment and so forth. The distinction in that case is long term versus short term rentals. Some non-real properties commonly available for rent or lease are:
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