When you've taken the time to read through the lease thoroughly (don't let the landlord rush you!), check to see that the lease mentions which province will regulate this agreement. Then validate the document with the date and your name and signature (make sure the landlord signs it too!). Keep a copy for your files, and don't hand any money over until you actually sign the lease.
Only tenants and people listed as occupants may reside in the premises. The landlord must be informed and approve of any change to the list of permitted tenants. Children born or adopted while the tenant lives in the premises are automatically added to the lease as occupants. Also, each jurisdiction may restrict the number of tenants/occupants in the premises if that number violates health or safety standards for housing. Health and safety standards are typically expressed as 1 person per X sq. ft. The standard varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction so if you are concerned, check with your local housing/public health authority.
A landlord is required to deliver the dwelling in "good habitable condition" and the tenant is required to leave the dwelling  in "good habitable condition." In between, it is the landlord's responsibility to maintain upkeep. Request repairs to the super/janitor, where applicable, and, if needed, then follow up with the landlord. If there are neglect disputes, especially regarding urgent repairs follow up with the Regie.
Prior to moving in, the tenant and the landlord should walk through the premises and write down any existing damage. This written account is called an inspection report. The landlord and tenant should both get a copy of this report. In some jurisdictions, an inspection report is also required upon moving out, as a condition for the landlord to make a claim against the tenant's security deposit.
The Ontario government is requiring all landlords to use a standard lease template for all new leases beginning April 30, 2018. Lawyers are encouraged to make themselves familiar with the terms of this new lease so they can advise clients of their obligations and rights under the new lease. The information below is taken from the Government of Ontario website at https://www.ontario.ca/page/renting-ontario-your-rights. The official page containing the standard lease template is at http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/Page18704.aspx.

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You must provide proper notice to the landlord that you do not intend to renew the lease, before the lease expires. Notice must be given a certain amount of time before the lease expires, as dictated by statute in your jurisdiction. This amount of time is called the "notice period". Typically, the notice period is one month for leases with a term of one month or less, and two or three months for leases with a term of more than one month, but this will vary according to the jurisdiction. You should consult the governing statute for the jurisdiction the property is located in to find out the required notice period for your lease.
The time use of a chattel or other so called "personal property" is covered under general contract law, but the term lease also nowadays extends to long term rental contracts of more expensive non-Real properties such as automobiles, boats, planes, office equipment and so forth. The distinction in that case is long term versus short term rentals. Some non-real properties commonly available for rent or lease are:
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Typically, renting a room or a basement suite means you are sharing an accommodation with the landlord. A basement suite is a self-contained dwelling unit complete with its own kitchen, bathroom, and living area. Most tenants of a basement suite use a separate entrance to enter the house than the rest of the occupants. If you rent a room, you will likely share either the kitchen or bathroom with the landlord or other tenants.
Make sure that every appliance and piece of furniture that is mentioned in the lease exists on the property. If not, at the end of the agreement the landlord will be liable to claim whatever is mentioned in the lease as part of the property. If a move-in checklist is being completed, this is not a huge issue, but the tenant should double-check to ensure that all is included as part of the lease. 

Additional occupants: The agreement may include a term restricting the number of occupants in a rental unit or requiring the landlord’s permission before additional occupants can live in the rental unit.  If additional occupants are added, a landlord can only increase the rent if the tenancy agreement includes a term allowing the rent to vary based on the number of occupants or the parties all agree to sign a new tenancy agreement.  
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